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Articles by Sandra Olivetti Martin

92 and never, never, never giving up

Wind-driven waves roiled the river into a sandy soup for Bernie Fowler’s 29th annual Patuxent River Wade In June 12.
    “It feels like the surf in Ocean City,” laughed a wader bound hand-in-hand to every other in the long line radiating out from the 92-year-old retired state senator and Patuxent River champion.
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How a classic continues to charm

Nathan Detroit, Harry the Horse, Dave the Dude, The Seldom Seen Kid and Benny Southstreet sprang from the imagination of Broadway-bedazzled newspaperman Damon Runyon, who died in 1946. His stories made it to Broadway as Guys and Dolls in 1950.
    That’s 66 years ago. Yet it keeps turning up.
    2nd Star Productions is about to do it again.
    Why? Is it the names? The story? Or what?
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Local artist takes you 15,000 feet for this Commissioning Week highlight

Never in real life will you see the Blue Angels as Joe Barsin captures them in his iconic graphic on Bay Weekly’s cover. For the Annapolis artist’s eye encapsulates the whole of the U.S. Naval Academy’s Commissioning Week in a single soaring moment.
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Are you edging closer to marking this Mother’s Day with your own words?
    Perhaps local writer Janice Lynch Schuster of Edgewater can push you over the edge.
    For her mother, in memory of her grandmothers — and in appreciation of the many acts of motherhood — she has combined 17 quatrains — stanzas of four lines — into a poem-book, What Are Mothers For?
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Get a taste of the West and Rhode rivers while supporting their heath

“You couldn’t have picked a better time for a visit,” I told the friends coming our way this weekend. “This Saturday we’ll show you what Chesapeake Country is all about.”
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He and Tom Sawyer invite you on five weeks of adventures

The rumor of Mark Twain’s death has apparently been very greatly exaggerated. For the legendary American storyteller, born as Samuel Clemens in 1835 in Florida, Mo., is paying Annapolis a second visit — 109 years after his first and 106 years after his death on April 21, 1910.
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School-age artists wanted to paint, draw and win prizes

Horses hold a special place in both the American heart and American art.
    Though not native to our continent, horses resonated with the great painters of the early American West — George Catlin, Karl Wimer and Frederick Remington — as symbols of primal power. Look in many middle schoolers’ notebooks or any art gallery, and you’ll see the tradition continues.
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Roadside buffers trap pollution in their roots

It’s not too early for planting trees — especially when you’ve got the digging power of the Maryland State Highway Administration. They’re busy planting roadside buffers of 8,700 trees in Anne Arundel County. Deciduous and evergreen in mixed rows, those trees will improve the health of the Chesapeake watershed by capturing pollution-producing nitrogen and phosphorus in their root systems.
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Will Tubman be the first woman on U.S. currency?

Harriet Tubman’s portrait will be in our hands and wallets, if Congressman Chris Van Hollen and the Dorchester County Council get their way. Both have asked federal Treasury Secretary Jack Lew to make the Maryland-born abolitionist the woman promised to be featured on the next new $10 bill.
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Eventually, we get big things done

I love the fell swoop. If I paint a room, I want it finished before bedtime. If I find a shrub in the wrong place, I grab the shovel. Got a story idea? I want it now. Done in a day — a week here at Bay ­Weekly — is the hallmark of journalism.
    I wish that more things dried as quickly as paint. Or flowed as fast as words.
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