view counter

Articles by Leigh Glenn

St. John’s College grad Ahmet Ertegün made good — very good

Annapolis has been the hangout of many famous people. William Paca. Charles Carroll. George Washington. Kevin Spacey. Barbara Kingsolver. Ahmet Ertegün.
    Who?
...

Learn from plantsman Bill Cullina and ­benefit Unity Gardens

This time of year gardeners feel the itch for warm weather. We’re wistful about anything green and have gardening books spread out in inconvenient places in eagerness for another season.
    Scratch the itch by honing your design skills with plantsman, author and Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens executive director William Cullina. He comes to Annapolis March 7 to talk about the botany of design.
...

Recipes for humans and other fanciers

Jack-o-lanterns have withered, but pumpkins are not old news yet. November is the biggest month of the year for pumpkin consumption. Pie, ice cream, cheesecake, soup, muffins, bread and lattes all feature pumpkins this time of year. In anticipation of Thanksgiving, canned pumpkin sales soar. Ninety percent of canned pumpkin sales are made in the fourth quarter.
...

Read the book, meet the author

Gardeners don’t need degrees in botany. But knowing a little botany — plus a bit about the history of human relationships with plants — creates a deeper gardening experience. Just ask local author Ruth Kassinger.
...

For a sweet birthday, plan a favorites tour

My beloved, Nick, and I were three months into our relationship when his birthday arrived in August 2008. By then I knew what interested him — history, travel, sculpting — well enough to plan a day trip that combined it all. I did not tell him where we would go, just to wear sturdy shoes and bring a cap and sunscreen.
    On a sunny Sunday, we headed south on Route 2, eventually ending up at Colton’s Point in St. Mary’s County.
...

Good earth still open for gardeners

On a farm in St. Margaret’s, land that had been in sod has sprouted raised beds for a new community garden. The one-half-acre space gets full sun, has good fencing to keep out the deer and plenty of water. Thanks to the dedication of the farmers and members of Grow Annapolis, those with shade-bound yards now have a place to go — not just to raise food, but also to make new friends....

Will our trash be ­treasure in 3,000 years?
You’re living on top of history, your story standing on others before it. If you live on the water, that history could be middens.
 
Chesapeake Country is dotted with thousands of the old refuse heaps built up of trash left behind by pre-Europeans. Our middens are mostly eastern oyster shells — plus tons of bones, shells, pottery shards and chipped stone that survived thousands of years.
 
...

If you’ve ever wanted your own fresh eggs, Michele Allman can help you decide if keeping hens is for you

I am not alone in imagining chickens in my back yard. Backyard flocks are on the upswing in suburban and urban America, Chesapeake Country included. Why, the state’s capital allows city-dwellers to raise them.
...

Life is wired to birth new life

When I started to clear my herb garden to make room for a couple of sage plants, I almost jumped out of my skin: A clutch of eggs lay in a bird-made bowl under the overhang of rosemary and chickweed.
    But no mama, in this case, a mallard. I found her absence odd, but she always returned.
    When she went broody and was no longer leaving, I offered her some food. She hissed.
...

Who today knows what an undisturbed forest looks like? How many of us get to breathe the healing air in such places?

England has Stonehenge. France has cave paintings. We have national parks.    
    The parks were a cutting-edge idea when they were born in 1872, with the founding of Yellowstone. With some 2.7 million visitors a year, our 59 national parks are still a big deal.
...