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Articles by Diane Burt

Today’s oysterman is likely to be a woman — and a farmer rather than a hunter-gatherer

“Everything we did was by trial and error,” recalled Jill Buck of her and husband Andy’s early days as oyster farmers.
    “We filled our cages to the brim with the seeds and put them out in the river,” Jill explained. “When we went back to check on them a few weeks later, the growing oysters had burst out of the cages.”
    Lesson Number One: Spread a thin layer of seeds on the bottom of each cage....

Therapeutic horses make good riders

Riders had their day in the sun at Maryland Therapeutic Riding’s Spring Horse Show.
    Green pastures and paddocks surround an indoor arena as good as you’d see on the hunter/jumper show circuit. Overflow spectators parked along the lane under shady trees. In arena and show ring, volunteers abounded, helping families settle and riders prepare to mount.
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Donald Sheckells: Stuck on oystering

If oystering has been your life for more than 40 years, what do you do when age catches up with you?
    If you’re Donald Sheckells, you’re still working.
    The Shady Side waterman no longer braves winter on the water to harvest oysters. But he’s still shucking and selling them.
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After generations harvesting wild oysters, Chesapeake watermen are learning to raise them

Where have all the nicknames gone?
    Once upon a time you had one — Popeye, Spanky, Hambone — if you were an oysterman working the Bay.
    Nowadays, oystermen are mostly gone, along with their nicknames. In Anne Arundel and Calvert counties, only about a dozen commercial oystermen still work.
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Meet her at Barnes & Noble

Fans of award-winning author Lisa Scottoline have a treat this week. She’s coming to Annapolis for a reading and signing of her latest book, Accused.
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